Tag Archives: Boris Savoldelli

A Finely-crafted Contemporary Celebration of Early Progressive Music

Maurizio Brunod, Giorgio Li Calzi, Boris Savoldelli – Nostalgia Progressiva (distributed by MoonJune Records, 2019)

Three forward-thinking Italian musicians celebrate the progressive music of the late 1960s and the early 1970s on Nostalgia Progressiva.

Maurizio Brunod, Giorgio Li Calzi, Boris Savoldelli – Nostalgia Progressiv

The album opens with “Formentera Lady,” a song that appeared on King Crimson’s Islands in 1971. The song is reconstructed with glitchy electronics, jazz trumpet, ambient electronics, soaring electric guitar and soft vocals.

Trsack 2 is the lovely “Mate Kudasai” from King Crimson’s album Discipline (1981), metamorphosed into a delightful bluesy version.

Although not a progressive music song, the trio reconstructs “Tomorrow Never Knows” by The Beatles (Revolver, 1966), transforming it successfully with mesmerizing loops, processed vocals, and guitars.

“Shipbuilding” is a song with lyrics by Elvis Costello that was written during the Malvines/Falklands War of 1982. In its new incarnation, it becomes a laid back song with vocals, guitar and spellbinding, gorgeous electronic ambience.

Next is Radio Activity, a song by German electronic music and techno pioneers Kraftwerk, included inn the album Radio-Activity (1975). Here, it reappears as a dub rock song.

The memorable song “I Talk to the Wind” from King Crimson’s In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) begins as an acoustic folk song that evolves into a trip hop wonder, featuring electronically-manipulated trumpet, similar to Jon Hassell’s work.

Another progressive rock classic, “Starless,” by King Crimson (Red album, 1974) in transformed into a futuristic piece with acoustic guitar, lead melody on trumpet and looped vocals.

“Taranaki” is the most jazz-oriented piece. This re-reading contains electronic beats, wordless vocals and soft trumpet.

Yet another gem from King Crimson appears on this recording, “Moonchild” (In the Court of the Crimson King, 1969). This version features exquisite acoustic guitar, vocals and trumpet.

The last track is “Gioco di bimba,” originally released by the fabulous Italian progressive rock group Le Orme (Uomo di pezza, 1972). It reappears with electronic beats and ambiance plus vocals.

Lineup: Maurizio Brunod on electric and acoustic guitar, samples; Giorgio Li Calzi on trumpet, fluegelhorn, keyboards, electronics; and Boris Savoldelli on vocals, electronics, and vocal synth 3D prototype.

Buy Nostalgia Progressiv

Pink Floyd Through the Experimental Jazz Prism

Savoldelli Casarano Bardoscia - The Great Jazz Gig in the Sky
Savoldelli Casarano Bardoscia – The Great Jazz Gig in the Sky

Savoldelli Casarano Bardoscia – The Great Jazz Gig in the Sky (Moonjune, 2016)

This recording is a jazz recreation of Pink Floyd’s masterpiece Dark Side of the Moon. The trio behind the project is led by Italian vocalist Boris Savoldelli. He has a gritty voice that’s an acquired taste. On this project Savoldelli teams up with saxophonist Raffaele Casarano and bassist Marco Bardoscia.

Savoldelli’s chameleonic vocal style seems to have a lot of fans. In my case, I liked his vocal effects and found the instrumental sections with trance-like jazz beats, the minimalist chamber passages, Dewa Budjana’s guitar, and electronic atmospheres mesmerizing.

The lineup on The Great Jazz Gig in the Sky includes Boris Savoldelli on vocals, vocal noises and electronics; Raffaele Casarano on saxophones and electronics; and Marco Bardoscia on double bass and electronics.

The album also features special guests Dewa Budjana on guitars; and spoken word by Maurizio Nobili.

Buy The Great Jazz Gig in the Sky